Tag Archives: Bahaullah

Bicentennial of the birth of Bahá’u’lláh, 22nd of October 2017

In recent years, the Bahá’í world received instructions from their administrative head (The Universal House of Justice) to start using the “Badi calendar” for the celebrations of their Holy days. This changes things…some dates now fluctuate year to year; kind of like Easter. For instance, most notably the Birth of The Báb and Bahá’u’lláh are now TWIN HOLY DAYS! That means they are celebrated on two consecutive days. These days will range over the next 10 years between mid October to mid November. Other holy days like the New Year, the Intercalary Days, the Festival of Ridván, and the 19 Day Feasts also change but they only fluctuate a little from being a day forward or a day earlier depending on when the New Year was celebrated on that year.

Now, this post is about the Bicentennial of the Birth of Bahá’u’lláh, the Manifestation of God for Today. It’s a big deal. He was born in Tehrán on November 12th 1817 – 200 years later, we are going to have celebrations ALL OVER THE WORLD!

I am just very excited about these events and I am sure lots of creative mids will be at work to make something uplifting and dignified. Make sure you check out where the celebration nearest to you will be next year 🙂

For those not yet very familiar with Bahá’u’lláh’s life, you can read about His life here and from His Pen here. He is the Manifestation of God for today and the attributes of His Blessed Person can be clearly seen and distinguished through the accounts and history of His life.

Photo credit: Adib Roy

Photo credit: Adib Roy

 


Contact us! We want to know what you would like to see us write about here!

Dear all;

We haven’t been as active here as we would like but we want to make it up to you all so…we are asking all of you to help us come up with new topics. If there has been something on your mind or if you have heard something and want to know more, shoot us a line and let us know. We would love to do some research for you and do our best to expand on the topic for everyone’s knowledge.

We can’t wait to see if we get any brave replies. Thank you!!

P.s. Here is a sneak peak on what we have been working on this week:

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Ayyám-i-Há! What does it mean to Bahá’ís?

The Bahá’í calendar has 19 months of 19 days each. Let’s do the math… that equals to 361 days. So, what happens to the other 4-5 days (if leap year) remaining? Bahá’u’lláh has given those days the name of The Days of Ayyám-i-Há (intercalary days) which precede the Baha’i month of ‘Ala which is the very last month of the year in which Baha’is also observe the fast for 19 days.

Ayyam-i-Ha is a celebration in which Baha’is all over the world to charitable acts, rejoicing, visiting friends and the giving of gifts. It is an even happier time for children to whom gifts are mostly given to.

We want to share this beautiful prayer specially dedicated to the Intercalary days:

My God, my Fire and my Light! The days which Thou hast named the Ayyam-i-Ha [1] in Thy Book have begun, O Thou Who art the King of names, and the fast which Thy most exalted Pen hath enjoined unto all who are in the kingdom of Thy creation to observe is approaching. I entreat Thee, O my Lord, by these days and by all such as have during that period clung to the cord of Thy commandments, and laid hold on the handle of Thy precepts, to grant that unto every soul may be assigned a place within the precincts of Thy court, and a seat at the revelation of the splendors of the light of Thy countenance.

These, O my Lord, are Thy servants whom no corrupt inclination hath kept back from what Thou didst send down in Thy Book. They have bowed themselves before Thy Cause, and received Thy Book with such resolve as is born of Thee, and observed what Thou hadst prescribed unto them, and chosen to follow that which had been sent down by Thee.

Thou seest, O my Lord, how they have recognized and confessed whatsoever Thou hast revealed in Thy Scriptures. Give them to drink, O my Lord, from the hands of Thy graciousness the waters of Thine eternity. Write down, then, for them the recompense ordained for him that hath immersed himself in the ocean of Thy presence, and attained unto the choice wine of Thy meeting.

I implore Thee, O Thou the King of kings and the Pitier of the downtrodden, to ordain for them the good of this world and of the world to come. Write down for them, moreover, what none of Thy creatures hath discovered, and number them with those who have circled round Thee, and who move about Thy throne in every world of Thy worlds.

Thou, truly, art the Almighty, the All-Knowing, the All-Informed.

– Bahá’u’lláh

[1 The Days of Ha, Intercalary Days.]. (Compilations, Baha’i Prayers, p. 236)


Mírzá Mihdí – The most Pure Branch

Mirza Mehdi Mírzá Mihdí (Mehdí) was Bahá’u’lláh’s youngest son. Born in Iran in 1848, he was a gentle child that loved his Father very much. From a young age, he accompanied his Father on His exile without complaints or requests.

His life was the perfect example of complete detachment and unconditional love.

“To the galling weight of these tribulations was now added the bitter grief of a sudden tragedy — the premature loss of the noble, the piousMírzá Mihdí, the Purest Branch, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá’s twenty-two year old brother, an amanuensis of Bahá’u’lláh and a companion of His exile from the days when, as a child, he was brought from Tihran to Baghdad to join his Father after His return from Sulaymaniyyíh. He was pacing the roof of the barracks in the twilight, one evening, wrapped in his customary devotions, when he fell through the unguarded skylight onto a wooden crate, standing on the floor beneath, which pierced his ribs, and caused, twenty-two hours later, his death, on the 23rd of Rabi’u’l-Avval 1287 A.H. (June 23, 1870). His dying supplication to a grieving Father was that his life might be accepted as a ransom for those who were prevented from attaining the presence of their Beloved.

In a highly significant prayer, revealed by Bahá’u’lláh in memory of His son — a prayer that exalts his death to the rank of those great acts of atonement associated with Abraham’s intended sacrifice of His son, with the crucifixion of Jesus Christ and the martyrdom of the Imam Husayn — we read the following: “I have, O my Lord, offered up that which Thou hast given Me, that Thy servants may be quickened, and all that dwell on earth be united.” And, likewise, these prophetic words, addressed to His martyred son: “Thou art the Trust of God and His Treasure in this Land. Erelong will God reveal through thee that which He hath desired.”

After he had been washed in the presence of Bahá’u’lláh, he “that was created of the light of Bahá,” to whose “meekness” the Supreme Pen had testified, and of the “mysteries” of whose ascension that same Pen had made mention, was borne forth, escorted by the fortress guards, and laid to rest, beyond the city walls, in a spot adjacent to the shrine of Nabi Salih, from whence, seventy years later, his remains, simultaneously with those of his illustrious mother, were to be translated to the slopes of Mt. Carmel, in the precincts of the grave of his sister, and under the shadow of the Báb’s holy sepulcher.”

(Shoghi Effendi, God Passes By, p. 188)


Baha’i Faith: 29th of May – Ascension of Bahá’u’lláh.

On the 29th of May, Baha’is all over the world commemorate the ascension of  the Promised One of all religions and Messenger of God for today: Bahá’u’lláh. He was a prisoner and exile for 40 years of His blessed life. Throughout there were victories and crises but the Truth of His Revelation shone even brighter after every effort to eradicate its light.

Here is the story of what happened before His Passing, extracted from God Passes By, p.222-223:

Already nine months before His ascension Bahá’u’lláh, as attested by ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, had voiced His desire to depart from this world. From that time onward it became increasingly evident, from the tone of His remarks to those who attained His presence, that the close of His earthly life was approaching, though He refrained from mentioning it openly to any one. On the night preceding the eleventh of Shavval 1309 A.H. (May 8, 1892) He contracted a slight fever which, though it mounted the following day, soon after subsided. He continued to grant interviews to certain of the friends and pilgrims, but it soon became evident that He was not well. His fever returned in a more acute form than before, His general condition grew steadily worse, complications ensued which at last culminated in His ascension, at the hour of dawn, on the 2nd of Dhi’l-Qádih 1309 A.H. (May 29, 1892), eight hours after sunset, in the 75th year of His age. His spirit, at long last released from the toils of a life crowded with tribulations, had winged its flight to His “other dominions,” dominions “whereon the eyes of the people of names have never fallen,” and to which the “Luminous Maid,” “clad in white,” had bidden Him hasten, as described by Himself in the Lawḥ-i-Ru’yá (Tablet of the Vision), revealed nineteen years previously, on the anniversary of the birth of His Forerunner.

Six days before He passed away He summoned to His presence, as He lay in bed leaning against one of His sons, the entire company of believers, including several pilgrims, who had assembled in the Mansion, for what proved to be their last audience with Him. “I am well pleased with you all,” He gently and affectionately addressed the weeping crowd that gathered about Him. “Ye have rendered many services, and been very assiduous in your labors. Ye have come here every morning and every evening. May God assist you to remain united. May He aid you to exalt the Cause of the Lord of being.” To the women, including members of His own family, gathered at His bedside, He addressed similar words of encouragement, definitely assuring them that in a document entrusted by Him to the Most Great Branch He had commended them all to His care.

The news of His ascension was instantly communicated to Sulṭán ‘Abdu’l-Ḥamíd in a telegram which began with the words “the Sun of Bahá has set” and in which the monarch was advised of the intention of interring the sacred remains within the precincts of the Mansion, an arrangement to which he readily assented. Bahá’u’lláh was accordingly laid to rest in the northernmost room of the house which served as a dwelling-place for His son-in-law, the most northerly of the three houses lying to the west of, and adjacent to, the Mansion. His interment took place shortly after sunset, on the very day of His ascension.

For a full week a vast number of mourners, rich and poor alike, tarried to grieve with the bereaved family, partaking day and night of the food that was lavishly dispensed by its members. Notables, among whom were numbered Shí’ahs, Sunnís, Christians, Jews and Druzes, as well as poets, ‘ulamás and government officials, all joined in lamenting the loss, and in magnifying the virtues and greatness of Bahá’u’lláh, many of them paying to Him their written tributes, in verse and in prose, in both Arabic and Turkish. From cities as far afield as Damascus, Aleppo, Beirut and Cairo similar tributes were received.

The next paragraph illustrates the day when ‘Abdu’l-Bahá was appointed as His successor.

Thus simply and serenely did Bahá’u’lláh pass the evening of His life on earth until, after an attack of fever, He passed away on the 29th of May, 1892, at the age of seventy-five. Among the last Tablets He revealed was His Will and Testament, which He wrote with His own hand and duly signed and sealed. Nine days after His death the seals were broken by His eldest son, in the presence of members of the family and a few friends, and the contents of the short but remarkable document were made known. By this will ‘Abdu’l-Bahá was constituted His father’s representative and the expounder of His teachings, and the family and relatives of Bahá’u’lláh and all believers were instructed to turn to Him and obey Him. By this arrangement sectarianism and division were provided against and the unity of the Cause assured. (Bahá’u’lláh and the New Era p. 286)

Room where Bahá’u’lláh passed away